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Group-Centered Prevention Programs for At-Risk Students

Group-Centered Prevention Programs for At-Risk Students

of: Elaine Clanton Harpine

Springer-Verlag, 2010

ISBN: 9781441972484 , 155 Pages

Format: PDF, Read online

Copy protection: DRM

Windows PC,Mac OSX Apple iPad, Android Tablet PC's Read Online for: Windows PC,Mac OSX,Linux

Price: 118,99 EUR



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Group-Centered Prevention Programs for At-Risk Students


 

Preface

8

Acknowledgments

14

Contents

16

About the Author

20

Chapter 1: Introduction

22

Step 1: Type of Program

23

Chapter 2: Creating At-Risk Children and Youth

24

The Role of Prevention

25

How Families Help Create At-Risk Children and Youth

25

How Schools Help Create At-Risk Children and Youth

27

How School Counselors and Psychologists Help Create At-Risk Children and Youth

28

How Communities Help Create At-Risk Children and Youth

30

How Evidence-Based Programs Help Create At-Risk Children and Youth

31

How Reliance on Manualized Programs Helps Create At-Risk Children and Youth

33

Good Intentions Are Not Enough

33

Developing Group-Centered Program Packets

34

Benefits of School Mental Health

35

Step 2: Identify the Problem

35

Step 2, Design Example

36

Correcting At-Risk Problems in the Schools

36

Real-World Applications

36

Observational Extensions

36

Troubleshooting Checklists for Organizing a New Group

37

A Ready-to-Use Group-Centered Intervention: “Captain A and His Hot Air Balloon”

37

Chapter 3: Organizing a New Group

43

Underlying Principles of an Effective Group-Centered Prevention Program

43

Developing Effective Prevention Programs

47

Designing a Group-Centered Program Packet

48

Step 3: Proposed Change

49

Step 3, Design Example

50

Designing a Program of Change

51

Real-World Applications

51

Observational Extensions

51

Troubleshooting Checklists for Designing a New Group-Centered Program

52

A Ready-to-Use Group-Centered Intervention: “Self-Reflection: Using a Narrative to Teach Writing Skills”

52

Chapter 4: Identifying the Needs of the Group

57

Group Composition

58

Describing the Group

58

Step 4: Description of the Group

59

Step 4, Design Example

60

Evaluating Group Needs

63

Real-World Applications

63

Observational Extensions

63

Troubleshooting Checklists for Designing a New Group-Centered Program

63

A Ready-to-Use Group-Centered Intervention: “Sign-in, Please”

64

Chapter 5: Using Group Process as an Agent of Change

66

The Advantages of Using Groups

67

Using Group Process to Bring About Change

67

Group Process and Group Dynamics are not the Same

68

Help! This is an Impossible Group

69

Developing Positive Group Process

71

Formative Evaluations

71

Formative Evaluation: Part 1

72

Formative Evaluation: Part 2

73

Using Formative Evaluations in Designing an Effective Group-Centered Program

76

Developing a Group-Centered Prevention Program

76

Step 5: Building a Group Structure that Leads to Long Term Change

76

Using the Results from a Formative Evaluation

78

Step 5, Design Example

78

Creating a New Program

80

Real-World Applications

80

Observational Extensions

80

Troubleshooting Checklists for Designing a New Group-Centered Program

80

A Ready-to-Use Group-Centered Intervention: “Match the Sound”

81

Chapter 6: Group Process and Motivation

83

Intrinsic Motivation Helps Students Cope with Unexpected Situations in the Classroom

84

Intrinsic Motivation Helps Students Achieve Psychological Wellness

85

Creating an Intrinsic Learning Environment

85

How to Use the Six Motivators in Your Program Design

89

Step 6: Building Intrinsic Motivators into Your Program Design

89

Step 6: Design Example

91

Intrinsic Motivation is Essential for an Effective Group-Centered Prevention Program

94

Real-World Applications

94

Observational Extensions

94

Troubleshooting Checklists for Designing a New Group-Centered Program

94

A Ready-to-Use Group-Centered Intervention: “A Simple Pop-Up Book”

95

Chapter 7: The Role of Interaction in a Group

97

Building Interaction into Your Group Design

98

A Strong Introduction is Essential to Positive Group Interaction

98

Group Interaction is the Key to Successful Group Programming

99

Keep Interaction Positive

100

Interaction Must Be Positive to Be Effective

101

The Need for Acceptance

102

Positive Interaction Leads to Intrinsic Motivation

102

Creative Does Not Mean Successful

103

Create Positive Interactive Interventions

103

Evaluate the Effectiveness of Interactive Interventions

103

Step 7: Creating Positive Interaction

103

Step 7, Design Example

105

Interaction is Essential for Success

107

Real-World Applications

107

Observational Extensions

107

Troubleshooting Checklists for Designing a New Group-Centered Program

107

A Ready-to-Use Group-Centered Intervention: “Manners Please”

108

Session 1: Would You Like to Join Us for Dinner?

109

Session 2: When You Call on the Telephone

110

Session 3: You’re Invited

114

Chapter 8: Self-Efficacy: The Learning Component in Schools

116

How Does Self-efficacy Work?

117

Why is Skill-Building So Important with Self-efficacy?

117

How Can You Design Interventions that Rebuild Self-Efficacy?

118

Self-Efficacy Helps Reduce Classroom Problems

120

Step 8: Creating Learning Centers

120

Step 8, Design Example

121

Ready-to-Use Program Packets

123

Real-World Applications

125

Observational Extensions

125

Troubleshooting Checklists for Designing a New Group-Centered Program

125

A Ready-to-Use Group-Centered Intervention: “The Grumps on Vacation”

125

The Grumps on Vacation

126

Page 1

126

Page 2

126

Page 3

127

Page 4

127

Page 5

128

Page 6

128

Page 7

128

Page 8

129

Page 9

129

Page 10

129

Page 11

130

Page 12

130

Page 13

131

Page 14

131

Page 15

132

Chapter 9: Group Cohesion: The Therapeutic Factor in Groups

133

Paving the Way for Cohesion and Change

134

Using Therapeutic Factors in Group Programming

135

Step 9: Building Therapeutic Factors into Your Program Design

142

Step 9, Design Example

145

Real-World Applications

147

Observational Extensions

147

Troubleshooting Checklists for Designing a New Group-Centered Program

147

A Ready-to-Use Group-Centered Intervention: “The World Pollution Conference Puppet Play”

147

List of Puppets

148

Play

149

Chapter 10: Back to the Classroom

157

To Erase Failure in the Classroom

158

To Erase Failure in School-Based Mental Health

159

Step 10: Write the Final Draft for Your Group-Centered Prevention Program

160

References

161

Index

169