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UML for Real

UML for Real

of: Luciano Lavagno, Grant Martin, Bran Selic

Springer-Verlag, 2003

ISBN: 9780306487385 , 369 Pages

Format: PDF, Read online

Copy protection: DRM

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UML for Real


 

Contents

5

About the Editors

7

Acknowledgements

9

Preface

11

Chapter 1 Models, Software Models and UML

14

1. ON MODELS

14

1.1 The Role of Models in Engineering

14

1.2 Characteristics of Good Engineering Models

16

1.3 Models of Software

16

2. THE UNIFIED MODELING LANGUAGE

21

2.1 Customizing UML

23

2.2 UML Profiles

26

3. SUMMARY

27

REFERENCES

28

Chapter 2 UML for Real-Time

30

1. INTRODUCTION

30

2. QUALITATIVE REAL-TIME FEATURES

32

2.1 Concurrency Modeling

32

2.2 Communication Modeling

36

2.3 Behavior Modeling

41

3. QUANTITATIVE REAL-TIME FEATURES

52

3.1 RT modeling within state diagrams

52

3.2 RT modeling within sequence diagrams

54

3.3 UML Profile for Scheduling, Performance, and Time

55

4. FROM NOTATIONS TO DEVELOPMENT PLATFORMS: THE ACCORD/UML APPROACH

56

5. OMG PERSPECTIVES

61

REFERENCES

62

Chapter 3 Structural Modeling with UML 2.0

66

1. STRUCTURAL CONCEPTS OF UML 2.0 – THE ORIGINS

66

2. EXAMPLE – AN ACCESS CONTROL SYSTEM

68

2.1 Introducing the Example – Domain Statement

68

2.2 Domain Class Model

69

2.3 Behavior Modeling with Interactions (I)

71

2.4 Modeling with Internal Structures

74

2.5 Behavior Modeling with Interactions (II) – Decomposition

76

2.6 Finalizing the Internal Structure

79

2.7 Behavioral Modeling with State machines

81

2.8 The Consistency of Interactions and State Machines

85

3. CONCLUSIONS

88

REFERENCES

88

Chapter 4 Message Sequence Charts

90

1. MSCS AND HMSCS

92

1.1 Basic MSCs

93

1.2 Regular collections of MSCs

94

1.3 High-level MSCs and message sequence graphs

96

1.4 Other work on MSCs

98

2. LIVE SEQUENCE CHARTS

99

2.1 The duality of possible and necessary

100

2.2 Control constructs

104

3. THE PLAY-IN/PLAY-OUT APPROACH

105

3.1 Playing in Behavior

106

3.2 Play-out

108

4. COMMUNICATING TRANSACTION PROCESSES

109

5. SOME EXTENSIONS

113

5.1 Object Features

113

5.2 Timing Constraints

115

REFERENCES

117

Chapter 5 UML and Platform-based Design

120

1. INTRODUCTION

120

1.1 Platform-based Design

121

1.2 UML and Embedded System Design

122

2. BACKGROUND

124

2.1 Related work

124

2.2 The Metropolis design environment

125

3. UML PLATFORM PROFILE

126

3.1 Modeling Platforms Using UML

126

3.2 Stereotypes

127

4. UML PLATFORM DESIGN METHODOLOGY

129

4.1 Design Problem Formulation

130

4.2 Functional Specification

131

4.3 Platform Specification

134

4.4 Communication Refinement

135

4.5 Mapping

137

5. CONCLUSIONS

139

REFERENCES

139

Chapter 6 UML for Hardware and Software Object Modeling

140

1. INTRODUCTION

140

2. EMBEDDED SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT METHODS

142

3. THE HASOC DESIGN LIFECYCLE

143

3.1 Product Concept

144

3.2 Uncommitted Modeling

145

3.3 Committed Modeling

146

3.4 System Integration

147

3.5 Platform Modeling

147

4. CASE STUDY: DIGITAL CAMERA

149

4.1 Uncommitted Model

150

4.2 Committed Modelling

152

4.3 System Integration

153

4.4 Platform Modelling

155

5. CONCLUSIONS AND FURTHER WORK

158

REFERENCES

159

Chapter 7 Fine Grained Patterns for Real-Time Systems

162

1. INTRODUCTION

162

1.1 What is a Design Pattern?

163

1.2 Basic Structure of Design Patterns

166

2. USING DESIGN PATTERNS IN DEVELOPMENT

169

2.1 Pattern Hatching – Locating the right patterns

169

2.2 Pattern Mining – Rolling your own patterns

171

2.3 Pattern Instantiation – Applying Patterns in your designs

172

3. CATEGORIES OF MECHANISTIC PATTERNS

173

3.1 Resource Management

174

3.2 Concurrency

175

3.3 Distribution

177

3.4 Safety and Reliability

178

3.5 Reuse and Software Quality Patterns

181

3.6 Reactive (behavioral) patterns

182

REFERENCES

183

Chapter 8 Architectural Patterns for Real-Time Systems

184

1. INTRODUCTION

184

2. THE BASIC STRUCTURAL MICRO-PATTERNS

185

2.1 The Peer-to-Peer Micro-Pattern

186

2.2 The Container Micro-Pattern

186

2.3 The Layering Micro-Pattern

189

3. THE VIRTUAL-MACHINE LAYERING PATTERN

189

4. THE RECURSIVE CONTROL PATTERN

195

5. SUMMARY

200

REFERENCES

200

Chapter 9 Modeling Quality of Service with UML

202

1. INTRODUCTION

202

2. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE REAL-TIME PROFILE

203

3. COMPONENTS OF THE REAL-TIME PROFILE

205

4. MODELING RESOURCES AND QOS

207

4.1 Resources

207

4.2 Analysis contexts

209

4.3 Categories of resources

211

5. MODELING TIME AND TIMING MECHANISMS

212

5.1 The model of time

212

5.2 Modeling timing mechanisms

214

6. MODELING PLATFORMS

215

7. SUMMARY

216

REFERENCES

217

Chapter 10 Modeling Metric Time

218

1. INTRODUCTION

218

2. PHILOSOPHICAL AND PHYSICAL TIME

221

2.1 Continuous and discrete time

222

3. METRIC TIME AS USED IN OMG PRODUCTS

223

3.1 Point versus interval semantics of time

225

4. TIMING ANALYSIS IN RT UML – THE USER PERSPECTIVE

226

4.1 Interaction-centered models of computation

227

4.2 Time modeling in interaction-centered model of computation – an example

228

5. CONCLUSIONS

230

REFERENCES

232

Chapter 11 Performance Analysis with UML

234

1. INTRODUCTION

234

2. DEFINING PERFORMANCE REQUIREMENTS AND MEASURES

237

3. INPUTS TO ANALYSIS: WORKLOAD PARAMETERS

239

3.1 Resource Annotations

239

3.2 Annotations for a Step on a Sequence Diagram

241

3.3 Annotations for Load Intensity and Path Probability

242

4. DEFINING A SCENARIO IN UML

242

4.1 Defining a Scenario by a Sequence Diagram

243

4.2 Defining a Scenario by an Activity Diagram

244

5. PERFORMANCE MODELING

245

5.1 Layered Queueing Model

247

5.2 LQN for the Building Security System

247

5.3 Analysis Results

249

6. CONCLUSIONS

252

REFERENCES

252

Chapter 12 Schedulability Analysis with UML

254

1. INTRODUCTION

254

1.1 The logical model

257

1.2 The physical architecture

259

2. INTRODUCTION TO SCHEDULABILITY ANALYSIS

261

2.1 Rate Monotonic Analysis

261

2.2 Shared resources and priority inversion

264

3. SCHEDULABILITY ANALYSIS OF OO DESIGNS USING RMA: TASK CENTRIC DESIGN

268

3.1 Single event synchronization

270

3.2 Multiple-event synchronization

271

4. EVENT CENTRIC DESIGN

272

4.1 Schedulability analysis approach

274

4.2 Single thread implementation

275

4.3 Multi-thread implementation: dynamic thread priorities

276

4.4 Multi-thread implementation: problems with static thread priorities

278

5. AUTOMATED SYNTHESIS

279

6. OTHER APPROACHES

279

7. CONCLUSIONS

280

REFERENCES

280

Chapter 13 Automotive UML

284

1. THE AUTOMOTIVE DOMAIN

284

1.1 Reconciling the Needs of Automotive Software Development with Model-Based Approaches

285

1.2 Automotive Specific Constraints

287

1.3 (Meta) Model-Based Development Processes

288

1.4 Structure of the Chapter

289

2. AML SURVEY

289

2.1 The AML History

290

2.2 AML Features in a Nutshell

290

2.3 Using AML for Automotive Systems Development

292

3. THE AML

293

3.1 Abstraction Levels

294

3.2 Definition of Metamodel Fragments

296

3.3 Use of the Metamodel

299

4. CASE STUDY

304

4.1 The Window Regulator System

304

4.2 Modeling

305

5. CONCLUSIONS

311

REFERENCES

311

Chapter 14 Specifying Telecommunications Systems with UML

314

1. ITU SERVICE DESCRIPTION METHODOLOGY

315

2. ITU SPECIFICATION LANGUAGES

318

3. ENTER UML

319

4. SPECIFYING SERVICE DESCRIPTIONS

320

5. THE UML TELECOM PROFILES

330

REFERENCES

334

Chapter 15 Leveraging UML to Deliver Correct Telecom Applications

336

1. VERIFICATION AND VALIDATION

337

1.1 A UML MSC Profile

338

1.2 MSC Pathologies

341

2. FEATURE ANALYSIS

343

2.1 Consistency and Completeness of Protocols

344

2.2 Example Verification

345

3. TEST CASE GENERATION

348

3.1 Semantic Model

349

3.2 Test Generation

350

3.3 Test Strategies

351

4. END-TO-END V&V

353

REFERENCES

355

Chapter 16 Software Performance Engineering

356

1. INTRODUCTION

356

2. OVERVIEW OF SOFTWARE PERFORMANCE ENGINEERING

358

3. THE SPE MODELING PROCESS

360

4. CASE STUDY

364

4.1 Overview

365

5. SUMMARY

377

REFERENCES

378

Index

380